Snippers tijd, groot en klein

Eindelijk eens een dag zonder regen vandaag, de weerman voorspelt droger en kouder weer vanaf het weekend. Voor de middag staat een sessie portretfoto’s met politici op het programma, in Utrecht. Voor de ochtend heb ik de hond meegenomen naar het bos, in Assen. Het Asserbos is het mooiste bos van Noord-Nederland, het loopt tot aan de rand van het stadscentrum en je kan er drie uur lopen zonder twee keer hetzelfde pad te hoeven nemen. Bijna gedachtenloos verstuur ik een tweet over de portretsessies, wanneer ik een bericht zie dat zegt: “Skelet bij Gieten blijkt mens uit de IJzertijd”. Dat zet me aan het denken.

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DIY: hack a Perfex Wollensack lens into Leica LTM mount

After I discovered online that the 1940’s American Perfex Deluxe rangefinder was also available in a version with a Wollensak lens in a 38mm screw mount, I decided to buy one and find out if it would fit a Leica.

Only when it arrived I found out that the focussing unit of the Perfex is on the body, not on the lens. A bit like a really unsophisticated Contax focusing system. So much for easily adapting the lens for Leica, I thought. The camera sat on a shelf for quite some time. It wasn’t a feat of engineering either, using it was like photographing with a brick, both in ergonomics and in results. I didn’t even try, it was too obvious.

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Barnack Leica: true or fake? A comprehensive guide

Every now and then you see them surface, those expensive and rare Leicas. The Leica Luxus, for instance. Only three of those gold plated Leicas were ever made, and only one of those is known to be in existence today. Or the Wehrmacht, Luftwaffen or Kriegsmarine engraved Leicas of the second World War. But most of the time these ‘rare’ cameras are fakes. How can you tell the true Leicas from the fake ones? A small guide.

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DIY: Get a dented filter rim into shape again

So you’ve been looking for this very special lens that will make your Nikon / Minolta / Canon / Zeiss-Ikon (choose your brand) contemporary-correct camera kit complete, but the only specimen you can find has a bent filter rim? Despair not! For today I’m offering a simple DIY tool to straighten filter rims, provided they are made from metal that can bend back into shape.

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Komura rangefinder lenses, overview

Komura 28mm 3.5 on Leica IIIa

The history of the Komura brand lenses is little-known. Information on the company and the lenses it produced is difficult to find online. But, many of the Komura lenses are very good, both in build quality and in optical results!

The company started out with making lenses for Large Format cameras. But in the 1950s they also started manufacturing rangefinder lenses for Leica thread mount cameras, and switched over to making lenses for Nikon rangefinders in the 1960s. Later, they also manufactured enlarging lenses, lenses for various medium format systems and also briefly produced lenses for various models of SLRs. Komura probably was the first brand to build a 1.4/85mm lens in Nikon F mount!

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DIY: Cleaning a Canon 1.2/50mm rangefinder lens

On the net you can find all kinds of stories on this lens. Most say its very soft wide open, prone to flare and what else. But most of the time this is merely a side effect from shooting a 50+ year old lens that has gotten hazy inside. Most of these lenses have scratches in the front element coating, which cannot be remedied with this pictorial, but image quality still can be improved a lot by cleaning the lens up.

 

Wanna see how to get the most out of this lens again? Read on!

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The Konica Hexar AF: the ultimate compact film camera

Johan Niels Kuiper, fotograaf in Assen, Drenthe - Konica Hexar AF

Konica has always been a company with its own master plan on photography. The release of the Konica Hexar in 1993 came as a surprise to the photography community. The Konica Hexar film camera was shockingly good, despite its quirky button use to set the cameras functions with. It was hailed as the viable alternative for a Leica M6, and AutoFocus too!

In this digital day and era, I feel safe to say the Hexar is the best compact film camera ever produced. Full stop. What, you don’t believe me?

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